Gender Views

We received a wedding invitation last week from our professional network. The invitation card mentioned the name of the groom (whom we know) and the bride to be. Her name is ‘Trophy’. Now I know, one can only imagine how she would have gone through school and college with that name, and also of the innumerable puns (intended) that would have surrounded her at all ages. However, I was thinking of the day she was born. She must have made her parents so happy and I can practically visualize the pride and delight her parents would have felt in holding her and showing her off….you know…like a prized possession (almost like Lion King!)

Though gender bias exists throughout the world as per scientific literature, I may be one of the fortunate few who is yet to document this from any practical experience. In fact, my family may be quite weird. I am an only child and all my uncles and aunts (5 of them) have only a single girl child. Maybe it’s a genetic predisposition, but we have been a very contended lot with a house full of women. Sometimes I do feel, we have sidelined the male population to a background in our family. We do include them in decision making processes, but just so they don’t feel left out (J).

It is however, extremely important to have different perspectives while making important decisions for the family like health choices, financial choices, education for children, marriage decisions, buying a home etc and a balanced view emerging from all family members irrespective of their sex is valuable. I also think children and adolescents make good decisions too and should not be undermined in the process. More than stressing on gender, I am of the view that each person is valuable and has a lot to contribute. The dynamics of power distribution will change when we start valuing each person, instead of attaching adage of male female, girls boys etc.

The fact is that my family may be part of a very small microcosm. I have women colleagues who have felt domination every day of their lives, I have male colleagues who are constantly overruled by their mothers while making family decisions with their wives for their children. Power has and will always lead human kind through all ages.

There are three delays in obtaining timely healthcare, type 1 delays are those made at the family level, where the decision that the ailing person in the family needs urgent healthcare in a timely manner can lead to survival or death of the person. Type 2 delays are often transportation or means to get to the closest healthcare and can depend on decisions, economic conditions etc of the family or surrounding community, terrain and accessibility in remote areas and the type 3 delays are adequate and timely healthcare provided to the patient in a healthcare facility. All three delays together or individually can lead to survival or death. Gender plays an important role in all these delays and is particularly crucial at the type 1 delay stage. There is a lot of research evidence that type 1 delay causes extensive bleeding at child birth in mothers who deliver at home, especially in low and middle income countries and together with type 2 delay causes the largest portion of maternal death. Same is true for neonatal deaths.

What are the barriers? Gender is only one of them; social, traditions, customs, faith, economics, illiteracy, ignorance make up the rest. What are the solutions? Education of every child, awareness of family and community, more participatory mechanisms to include women, men, community in government health schemes are a few answers, together with greater outreach of front-line health workers into urban and rural communities.  Often in Maternal and Children Health programmes, the men are sidelined, however, they should know the programmes and their views are as important as the women and mothers. Community empowerment and education of all will lead to better understanding of men and women in general and build stronger families. As part of a public health research organization, the best we can do is to include a equal gender lens in all our studies. To be inclusive and create projects that benefit everyone and don’t exclude men and/or boys. Health should be gender free, it is for and by all.

 

 

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Organizational Leadership

“Leadership consists of nothing but taking responsibility for everything that goes wrong and giving your subordinates credit for everything that goes well”-Dwight D. Eisenhower

Last week Prof David Peters from Johns Hopkins University (JHU) was in our institute, addressing our faculty members for a short while. As an established public health practitioner, overseeing his division of 140 plus researchers and academicians with research network and collaborations across most countries in the world, he took up an impromptu session on career building with our faculty members at a mere notice of 5 minutes.

Through an informal discussion, Dr Peters examined the current level of research engagement in each faculty, where they wished to see themselves in five years and the opportunities and support they would need to do so including self work. He also helped acknowledge the challenges in our systems and ways to deal with them. These are not aspects that our faculty is unaware of, and given that solutions in the context of JHU may be quite different from our own indigenous solutions, there is always a scope for deeper introspection. However, the leadership quality he demonstrated was impressive. For the two hours, he held everyone’s attention. The engagement was participatory and there was an element of mentorship without being patronizing. Nor did he express his mastery over any particular area. He was more facilitative than overbearing.

The next day, the new Director of our institute (another seasoned public health practitioner) sat down with all faculty members and helped them devise a personal research plan, based on each person’s training and expertise, interests and where they wished to reach in some year’s time. There was an accountability plan as well along with it, each faculty was asked to write milestones, deliverables albeit self assessed and self proposed. I have worked in many organizations, however, this was the first time I came across a true leadership driven activity where a career plan was being devised for individual member with an accountability framework. I certainly hope that a supporting and enabling environment is provided to fulfill these individual goals. Our institute is small with a small team of faculty, hence face to face meetings, individual plans may work. In bigger groups, especially where there are 140 researchers involved, a lot is derived by setting an example that trickles down from top to bottom. More like stewardship that has been explained in a number of journal articles.

It’s not always about salary increments and benefits. Sometimes employees stay back in an organization because of self and career development plans that override benefits. Leadership involves looking outside oneself, creating an atmosphere for team members to rise and also be accountable for their actions, while mentoring them throughout. Most importantly, a leader understands the practical realities of their team members, resources, limitations and designs future plans accordingly.

  • How important is it for organization leaders to have social interactions with their colleagues?

“Sometimes you have to take a break from being the kind of boss that’s always trying to teach people things. Sometimes you just have to be the boss of dancing”.-Michael Scott, The Office

The answer to some extent lies in a mutual attitude. From my personal experience, Directors of institutes who had a regular faculty and staff meeting with their colleagues over a cup of tea had greater commitment from employees to solve organizational issues in a collective way. Not just issues, but volunteering in organizational activities also rose.

  • How important is it to reiterate organization values amongst the employees?

“Ten soldiers wisely led will beat a hundred without a head”.- Euripedes

There is no harm in reiterating organizational values like quality, accountability and trust at employee meetings. However, the leadership should also demonstrate these values amply before harping about them. Sometimes honesty goes a long way, real life stories also help where the leadership may explain that they set out to achieve something and were unable to, however they learnt something more important in that process. Being a leader doesn’t mean 100% success rate, it just means that one is able to cope with life in a much better way.

  • People management vs time management

“The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self-restraint to keep from meddling with them while they do it.” –Theodore Roosevelt

The answer is in making an impact. Organizational leaders are hard pressed for time between internal, external engagements, overseeing all the activities within organization, making decisions and also traveling around the world. Yes there is a need for balance in everything, however, making an impact in everything one does, adding value to meetings, however small these are, would be one way to leave a lasting impression. While delegation is a part of management, even more important is to know who can accomplish what in the given time.

  • Being able to take risks

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take”. –Michael Scott, The Office

In spite of having a deep understanding of whether a team can accomplish a task, the leader is still open to taking risks and challenging the norms. Yes there is a line between taking an intelligent risk and stupidity, but the leader has a sixth sense in terms of understanding that their team would rise above their own comfort zones to achieve a certain goal. Sometimes trust and confidence go a long way. For the first time, our new Director is moving the academic section from paper copies of books to kindle/tab versions. This is not a new aspect in India. Most Indian Institutes of Technology’s have moved to e-books a long time ago. But someone had to come to our institute of 10 years and make that move.

Leaders are perhaps not born, but made through their experiences, ambitions and will to work hard. Mostly importantly leaders are made through their undying faith in others and their undying faith in their own strengths.

Mother’s day- How do we save our mothers?

We have recently celebrated the woman who has helped us cope with life not only during our childhood, but also adulthood. We showed our appreciation to the superwoman, who shields us from everything that could cause us pain, and sometimes, to our embarrassment and sometimes joy, tries to guard us even when we are supposed to have found our own footing in the big world outside home. She is universally revered across cultures, religions, countries or the n number of divisions we have made to segregate ourselves.

But something isn’t right. Why are our mothers dying and why haven’t we been able to curtail this, even in 2017?  Maternal death is a serious issue especially in developing countries. Although we have brought down global maternal mortality by 47% since the 90s, as per the World Health Organization (WHO), about 830 women die due to pregnancy/delivery related problems around the world each day. These are mostly preventable. 99% of these deaths occur in the developing countries.  The odds of a 15 year old dying due to pregnancy/delivery related issue in developed countries is 1 in 4,990. In the developing nations, it is 1 in 180. Sadly most of these deaths occur due to reasons that are within our control.

Severe blood loss during pregnancy and post delivery is the main reason, followed closely by infections. In most cases of severe hemorrhage, injections of Oxytocin are enough to slow down blood loss. The many reasons for maternal death are health inequities, aka, basic services are not available to those who cannot pay for care. Distance to the nearest health care facility, availability of medicines in the facility, inadequate services are also key reasons adding up to the issue. A UNICEF led project in 6 states in India based on verbal autopsy of family members and community members of mothers who had lost their lives during child delivery, showed that cost for transport to the nearest health facility, literacy level of the mother, community awareness were leading cause of maternal deaths.

Personally I find the lack of awareness and non adherence to hygienic practices during childbirth and subsequent death of mothers due to infections, is most unsettling. Sepsis is a major problem, both in maternal as well as neonatal death. These defy all norms for extent of negligence. Additionally, through our incessant use of antibiotics we have successfully created microbes which are now resistant to most drugs, hence can easily compromise an infected mother and her newborn.

The WHO has recently adopted a resolution on sepsis that urges member nations to be more cognizant regarding causes, prevention and treatment of sepsis and tighten policies and regulations of activities leading to Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), to develop AMR stewardship activities and strengthen hygienic practices, clean childbirth practices and improvement in sanitation and nutrition.

Some of the basic things that we could do at our levels would be to create awareness amongst everyone we come in contact with. Every time we visit a clinic or a hospital, we could inquire about guidelines followed in infection management, waste management and AMR. We could also remind the health practitioners about hand hygiene and seek their advice in ways to prevent infections at our homes.

Every family needs a mother and every mother deserves a good healthy life, especially one that can be met by a few prevention steps

 

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Intergenerational transmission of poverty and escaping the poverty trap

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Last weekend I watched a delightful movie on something quite close to my heart. ‘Nil Battey Sannata’ depicted a mother and daughter’s journey through life. There were several moments which I could totally identify with. It was superb acting by a very able cast and although the subject was very down to earth, of a mother’s trials to provide a good future for her daughter, the cinema did do justice to balance all emotions very well. The teenage daughter had already resigned to the fact that her mother wouldn’t be able to put her through an expensive higher education, and had gone ahead and explored options of choosing a career as a nanny, something within her realms and ability.

A few days ago I was involved in a project dealing with intergenerational transmission of poverty and some of the dialogues in the movie brought back thoughts from work. The mother depicted in the movie was a daily wage earner, working in the informal sector. In India and many other lower and middle income countries, there is a huge section of population working in the informal sector and most survive on day to day earnings. Some don’t have enough to meet their daily needs and most do not have anything to save for the future. And this brings in another worry of a huge population of elderly people resulting from the same informal sector, without any sort of retirement savings.

I strongly feel that every human has a right to dream a rosy future and somewhere when one is consumed with thoughts solely of how they/their family can survive the next day, life is not completely justified. There is some information from research and mostly from the field of economics that intergenerational poverty is transmitted from parent to children especially in those living below the poverty line (BPL). Somewhere, there is a little mismatch, since the huge middle class strata of India, which extends from those just above the poverty line to those doing very well, often times demonstrate examples of children capable of attaining their dreams through hard work and education loans and scholarships and being able to climb from one strata to that higher. This is somehow extremely difficult for the poorest of the poor (BPL), even though many of the schools have very similar opportunities for growth. Additional aspects such as health and nutrition have been implied to add to lower school attendance in children and the reasons for being unable to escape the poverty trap become complex with multiple compounding factors.

What has been seen to work to some extent is conditional cash transfers (CCT). And more evidence from research is needed in this area. Pilot projects where cash transfers were made to the BPL families, tagged with compulsory school attendance, or availing government immunization/health programmes were seen to effect family nutrition and quality of life in a positive manner. School attendance also improved due to better nutrition and health. This would probably be a mechanism to escape the poverty trap. However, much more needs to be done in a proper structured manner. Also the process for CCT needs to be efficient without involving too many intermediaries that can raise avenues for corruption or bureaucracy or both (one stop mobile money transfer has worked well in Kenya). Community cooperatives also work to some extent, however, a strong community engagement, community participatory action methods are needed to be explored.

I am often frustrated that researchers do not come together to build sustainable projects. Grants are mostly driven with motivation for a few publications, or a PhD degree or obtaining a faculty position. Sustainable projects can be made possible only by a multidisciplinary team and until researchers stop working in silos where an economist only works with another economist and a qualitative researcher only with their own folks, it will be very difficult to achieve anything meaningful on the ground. One can generate multiple models of why things are not working, but ground level realities require tangible practical solutions and most importantly, ones which are sustainable in minimum resource settings.

Picture acknowledgement- Asian Development Bank

Anja and Hope

We are surrounded by it. No matter what steps we have taken, nationally, internationally, through government or through not for profit sectors, there has been no escape from it, nor will be for the next decade to come. Poverty will remain, so will the hunger in the emaciated bellies and eyes of little children and mothers will continue to weep, watching their conditions or abandon them out of sheer desperation and frustration of not being able to keep their promise to the little ones.

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This picture is of a two year old Nigerian boy, abandoned by his family and of Anja Loven, a care worker. I am sure her profession would have presented her with many similar occasions to come in contact with undernourished and emaciated children. However, something about this particular boy was different. It’s the sixth sense we all have, of knowing that with a little care, sometimes, the cycle of life can be reversed.

Anja named him Hope, and she and her colleagues took care of the boy, sent him to a medical facility and helped him heal. Today Hope is better. One cannot distinguish him from other children his age (Pic 2).  It just took proper medical care and kind attention to reverse the child’s state within months. Anja’s plea over internet also allowed for 1 million USD in donations to take care of Hope’s expensive medical bills.

Instead of asking why there’s not enough being done for the many other little ones who need all our support, I would state that this beautiful story shows that one person can make a difference in one more person’s life. That’s all it takes. We don’t have to save the world, we can leave that to the others. What we can do is to help just one more life. Be it a human, a bird, a tree or an animal.

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We do not have to provide monetary assistance always. A few students at my friend’s university campus got together to teach children of lesser salaried staff, during their free time. All it takes is time and a will to do something. The important thing is to make the effort. I am encouraged to see that the next generation of youngsters are immensely motivated and creative and moreover aware of their environment. They can design what’s best for the future of our country.

If we really cannot do much by ourselves, we should at least try and encourage those who are making a difference.