Expectations

Some fifteen years ago, when I first read Humayun Ahmed’s Himu, I completely understood why someone would make a habit out of aimlessly walking through the narrow streets of their locality and be able to sustain themselves by merely bonding with everyone in their environment. There was nothing unnatural in a person who did not have a normal day job or a proper home where he could rest at night or a friend circle that consisted of the same people one was used to catching up with, after a long day’s work.
I am sure, that we have seen or experienced a ‘Himu’ in our neighborhood, or within our own family or friend circle. I am also positive, that sometimes, we have thought and pondered about transforming into a ‘Himu’, just so to lose ourselves from our usual selves of following a ‘natural’ pattern. The fame of Himu and the popularity of Humayun Ahmed’s entire series on Himu, does indicate that not only I, but there are several others, who are equally attracted and mesmerized by his characteristics.

 
Was Himu trying to make a statement in protest of the usualness of the society? Did he defy norms by not expecting anything from life, by not having an ambition to succeed in his chosen career or save for a rainy day? Did he never wish for a family that understood and sheltered him in a four walled enclosure, or the comfort of his own bed where he could curl up into a fetal position in the darkest hour of the night?
Maybe not. Maybe, he was content with the ‘now’. However, the same society that upholds expectations, stable career, adult responsibilities, reached out to accommodate the ‘odd’ Himu and feed him an occasional minimalist, but hot meal. However, his life without expectations is what draws us to him.

 
Sometimes, even relationships that do not harbor expectations touch us and make themselves unforgettable. For instance, the bond between Fenno and Malachy in Julia Glass’s ‘Three Junes’. The book depicts how two people randomly brought together by life in a busy metropolis, can support each other sans expectations. Its empathy that bonds human beings to each other and to their environment. Empathy does have the power to sustain our planet.

While our society teaches us orderliness and structure, to remind us of being the most evolved species, our human-ness lets us know that it’s alright to sometimes, give up, not to follow norms, be on our own…for we will find kindred spirits on our own journeys and be grateful for our lives.

(So am I someone who is contained in the structures of society or living a life of boundless unrestrainedness?
I am both…. and grateful!)

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Published by

vivaran

Imperfectly perfect with interest in almost everything....raising kids, food designs, books, cinema, culture, science and research.